Cinematography

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Cinematography

Relatively few mainstream (read: nonpornographic) films have directly centered around bestiality, perhaps due to the taboo nature of the act throughout recent history – that being any time since the invention of the video camera in 1918. Even in places where it was not explicitly outlawed, it generally was not practiced openly by this time simply due to social repercussions. Remember, it was considered impolite simply to speak of sex openly back in those days.

Perhaps the oldest film on the list is Max My Love (1986), a movie about a woman having an affair with a chimpanzee.

Sleeping Dogs Lie (2006), also known as Stay, is a film about a girl who once performed oral sex on her pet dog, and the ethical dilemma of whether she should admit this to her lover or keep it secret forever. The film has a lot of drama in it!

A very recent film depicting a relationship between a human and non-human creature is Shape of Water (2017), a film about a mute woman who falls in love with a fish-man. She has a very high libido and can be seen masturbating throughout the film, eventually giving in and releasing her passion with her aquatic suitor.

Avatar (2009) deserves a mention because it tells the tale of a human who goes to another planet, attempts to blend in with the locals while inhabiting a body similar to theirs, and even ends up having their version of ‘sex’ with a N’avi (the name of their species).

Some documentary-type films are Hidden Love: Animal Passions (1999), Zoo (2007), and Coming Soon (2006), which is in the style of a documentary but which is actually fictional for the most part.

While not involving zoophilia, Porndogs: The Adventures of Sadie (2009) is a very explicit and sexual film about animals, canines in particular, and thus was worthy of mention as many zoos enjoyed the film quite a bit.

Ladyhawke (1985) is another one without explicit zoophilia, but it is a love story that takes place between two individuals who each have a curse put on them: by day, the woman is a hawk and the man is a human, by night, the woman is a human and the man is a wolf!

Ted (2012) deserves special mention, being about a plush bear who has sex with human beings, something which really comes to light in Ted 2 (2015), a film all about the bestiality/plushophilia romance between one man’s stuffed bear and a human woman. The lady marries Ted only to find out that man-and-wife relationships between women and their plushie beaus are not legally recognized. Not only that, but Ted is also unable to father children with her due to the fact that he doesn’t technically have sperm.

Most films are about another subject entirely and mention zoophilia only in passing, such as the scene in Clerks 2 (2006) where Dante, the manager of a convenience store, is going away and his friends decide to throw him a party, complete with a show known as “Kinky Kelly and the Sexy Stud”, which they are expecting to be a stereotypical Mexican dog-and-pony show with a donkey as the animal star.

Initially the men are confused when they see a man in a mask leading a donkey through shimmery curtains and into the midst of the room. They wait, but no woman appears. Frustrated, they demand to know where Kelly is and the man insists that the donkey is Kelly, despite the fact that it is a male.

Obviously they’ve been tricked and likely swindled out of money as well, but for a moment they sit and watch, despite appearing disturbed by the spectacle. Suddenly a woman arrives, and she announces that she is disgusted but cannot look away. Dante, who is engaged but nevertheless is attracted to this lady, decides to drag her outside, trying to calm her down by telling her that the sex show is just ‘interspecies erotica’ – a term the men came to agreement about earlier, when deciding what term to use for sex between humans and non-human animals.

The main character tries to confess his love for that woman before he leaves and loses the opportunity forever, but she is still hung up on the impressive size of the donkey’s penis. There is a long scene showing what is occurring indoors and then Jay rushes out to announce that “the Sexy Stud” is about to penetrate Kelly. The woman rushes back inside, apparently eager to view more of the ‘interspecies erotica’ she had witnessed when she first burst into the scene.

While not directly zoophilic, there are other movies which simply depict animals in a sexual manner, such as during the sequel to Crank, Crank 2: High Voltage (2009). The main character has a surgically-replaced heart which will only function for a short period of time, and then only as long as he can maintain consciousness and keep his system running in high gear.

He starts losing power and advises his girlfriend that friction would help solve the problem. She is more than happy to oblige and begins dry-humping him in front of a crowd of people at a racetrack. One thing leads to another and soon they are getting hot and heavy right on the track!

The horses are coming, racing along, and then suddenly the woman sees a horse leaping over her, his massive penis extended but not flared. He doesn’t achieve orgasm but it certainly looks like he enjoyed the show!

National Lampoon’s Van Wilder (2002) has a scene where the crew bakes cream-filled pastries and then takes them to a dog, which is then seen bucking and humping and the pastries are held out-of-view. It is unclear whether the dog is supposed to have been ejaculating into the center of each one or was merely jerked-off overtop of them but at any rate, his previously-enormous balls shrink down to normal proportions once the baked goods are ‘finished’. At the bottom of the basket, revealed only when the targets were well into their meal, there were pictures depicting how the cream-filled treats were prepared.

Not to be outdone, the popular American Pie series, no less than two films contain jokes about men having sexual contact with dogs, although typically it is depicted as accidental or more due to circumstantial evidence rather than overt contact.

For example: in American Wedding (2003), Stiffler is lying on the ground with a dog eating what appears to be whipped cream on the crotch of his boxers. His face is likewise covered in the gooey substance and he is making sounds of pleasure.

Distressed, the main character Jim attempts to pull the large dog (which appears to be a Briard) off of Stiffler, but only manages to get into an awkward doggystyle position relative to the animal, and then a Pomeranian approaches and begins humping his leg while he continues pulling on the dog licking his friend’s groin.

In Book of Love (2009) one dog, which appears to be either a mixed breed or Wheaton Terrier, eats a peanut butter sandwich that someone had been masturbating into, reminiscent of the famous pie scene the series was named for.

In Airplane (1980) the Captain’s wife is in bed when she receives a phone call that there was a problem with her husband’s flight. She turns on the light and a horse is seen lying in bed next to her. She tells him to let himself out the back and makes small talk, letting him know what’s what and being very businesslike. The horse, for his part, is very horse-like and he just whinnies and begins sitting up.

In Trading Places (1983) there is a scene where a man is dressed in a gorilla costume and closed in a cage with an amorous male gorilla. Two men observe that one of them is getting rather horny, and they wonder if they ought to sedate him with a tranquilizer gun? In the end they decide to “Let them have their fun”, and the man in the ape costume widens his eyes dramatically when the real ape begins grabbing him and the men comment that “The black one must be the female”.

Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995) also has a gorilla bestiality reference, again with the bad guy presumably acting as the passive partner in sexual activity. The trees can be seen shaking, hinting that they are likely making love already.

Not only comedies but sometimes horror movies will also involve human-animal contact.

In The Howling 3: The Marsupials (1987) an Australian scientist falls in love with a female named Jerboa, who belongs to a species of human-like marsupial werewolves. After the two saw a werewolf movie on a date, she confessed to the scientist (named Harry) that she is a werewolf and the transformations do not take place as depicted in films. Interestingly, this franchise has werewolf transformations which are induced by strobe lighting and other visual effects.

Things take a sinister and disturbing turn in The Cabin in the Woods (2011), when an intoxicated woman is dared to ‘make out’ with a taxidermy wolf mounted on the wall. She does this in the most dramatic and attention-seeking way possible, attempting to interact with it as though they are having a conversation and then kissing in a truly over-the-top fashion.

Even cartoons are not free of zoophilic jokes, most notably the Family Guy television franchise. The main character, Peter Griffin, owns a dog named Brian who regularly picks up human women, whom he is sexually intimate with.

On BoJack Horseman, an animated Netflix series about a talking anthropomorphic horse, relationships between humans and animals are the norm. BoJack himself is famous for having been a star on a sitcom which is by the time of this series defunct, and he is struggling with loads of personal problems. Nevertheless, he still manages to bed plenty of human women, but then again the other animals in the show have no problem with interspecies relationships either, and some even reproduce with humans.

Finally on Mike Tyson Mysteries, there is an episode known as “Unholy Matrimony” where a father is set against the prospective husband his daughter has picked out. The man has a nose like a pig – remember that, because it will be important later. When the wedding is set to begin, everyone gathers at the beach. Everyone is looking for the groom but he appears to be a no-show. Suddenly shouting is heard as he is dragged into the jungle. There is a pigeon there and he jokes that he will at least attempt to make the best of the situation by trying to sleep with a bridesmaid.

Inside the midst of the foliage, surrounded by various human-animal hybrids, the bride’s father confesses that he enjoys bestiality with countless types of animals and that the beasts which dragged the groom-to-be here were in fact his children, as was the groom himself. The man is shocked and disturbed by this revelation but when the bride arrives and learns the truth she decides that she loves him, half-pig or not, and the two proceed with their wedding.

The pigeon does end up sleeping with a woman, confessing that he has never had sex with a bridesmaid before. She tells him that she’s actually never slept with an animal before, to which the pigeon replies something about him believing it is relatively common.

Perhaps what will be most surprising is the fact that even Disney – generally considered appropriate for everyone – sometimes alludes to bestiality. In the live-action 101 Dalmatians (1996) Anita and her husband Roger are announcing to his boss, Cruella De Vil, that Anita is pregnant, the rude boss responds by saying “What can I say? Accidents will happen”. When Roger adds in that they are expecting puppies as well, Cruella replies “Puppies! You have been a busy boy,” implying that Roger had gotten the dog pregnant as well.

Of course it is no secret that with Beast from Beauty and the Beast (1991 animated and 2017 live-action) being transformed into a monstrous animal, he is still able to make Belle fall in love with him. Likewise Ariel from The Little Mermaid (1989 animated and 2018 live-action) was fish from the waist down, but when she manages to get enchanted and develop legs rather than a tail, she spends the rest of her life with a prince.