Alt.sex.bestiality

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The Usenet (/ˈjznɛt/) is a worldwide distributed discussion system available on computers. It was developed from the general-purpose Unix-to-Unix Copy (UUCP) dial-up network architecture. Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis conceived the idea in 1979, and it was established in 1980.[1] Users read and post messages (called articles or posts, and collectively termed news) to one or more categories, known as newsgroups. Usenet resembles a bulletin board system (BBS) in many respects and is the precursor to Internet forums that became widely used. Discussions are threaded, as with web forums and BBSs, though posts are stored on the server sequentially.[2][3]

A major difference between a BBS or web forum and Usenet is the absence of a central server and dedicated administrator. Usenet is distributed among a large, constantly changing conglomeration of servers that store and forward messages to one another via "news feeds". Individual users may read messages from and post messages to a local server, which may be operated by anyone.

Usenet is culturally and historically significant in the networked world, having given rise to, or popularized, many widely recognized concepts and terms such as "FAQ", "flame", sockpuppet, and "spam".[4] In the early 1990s, shortly before access to the Internet became commonly affordable, Usenet connections via Fidonet's dial-up BBS networks made long-distance or worldwide discussions and other communication widespread, not needing a server, just (local) telephone service.[5]

The name Usenet comes from the term "users network".[2] The first Usenet group was NET.general, which quickly became net.general.[6] The first commercial spam on Usenet was from immigration attorneys Canter and Siegel advertising green card services.[6]

Listing of zoophile boards in the Usenet as well as the corresponding historical context according to reports by Michael Kiok of the Zeta-Verein

Alt.sex.bestiality (asb)

Was originally set up as a joke, around 1992?, all of a sudden zoophiles were actually posting there and surprised by their sheer existence. With the course of time and the further spreading of the Internet this newsgroup developed however gradually like the others over the topic sex to a collecting point for all kinds of stuff strongly contaminated by SPAM and lost thereby drastically at meaning

Alt.sex.binaries.pictures.erotica.bestiality (asbpeb)

The binary-group belonging to the asb. There erotic pictures with animals were distributed.

Alt.talk.bestiality (atb)

After the asb had become unusable due to a lot of spam, this newsgroup was created. Without &sex&sex; in the name it was less spammed. There were arguments about the sebsternannt "good" Zoos (the real world zoos).

talk.sex (dts)

First zoos wrote there about zoophilia and usually triggered the already known defense and hate reactions. In the course of the time, however, they collected plus-points with some participants through its (usually) level-headed appearance. First they posted via the anonymous remailer anon.penet.fi of Johan Helsingius, in the course of the years and especially after the forced closure of this remailer under normal nicks. Some also under their real name. Even some non-zoophiles joined the side of the zoos in the course of time.

talk.love.act

Was the renaming of the dts, because it was spammed in the name because of the &sex&quote.


The Blumentritt wars

A member of the dts, Martin Blumentritt, attracted attention with his endless postings and extreme hostility towards zoos. A flamewar lasting about 6 years between zoos and Blumi and his vassals relaxed. Blumentritt started again and again and helped the zoos against his will very much. Most of the postings from this time can still be found in archived entries at Google or in private archives and are considered legendary.

  1. From Usenet to CoWebs: interacting with social information spaces, Christopher Lueg, Danyel Fisher, Springer (2003), <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css" />ISBN 1-85233-532-7, <templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css" />ISBN 978-1-85233-532-8
  2. 2.0 2.1 The jargon file v4.4.7 Archived January 5, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, Jargon File Archive.
  3. Chapter 3 - The Social Forces Behind The Development of Usenet Archived August 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, Netizens Netbook by Ronda Hauben and Michael Hauben.
  4. "USENET Newsgroup Terms – SPAM". Archived from the original on 2012-09-15.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  5. Pre-Internet; Usenet needing "just local telephone service" in most larger towns, depends on the number of local dial-up Fidonet "nodes" operated free of charge by hobbyist "SysOps" (as FidoNet echomail variations or via gateways with the Usenet news hierarchy. This is virtual Usenet or newsgroups access, not true Usenet.) The participating SysOps typically carry 6 - 30 Usenet newsgroups each, and will often add another on request. If a desired newsgroup was not available locally, a user would need to dial to another city to download the desired news and upload one's own posts. In all cases it is desirable to hang up as soon as possible and read/write offline, making "newsreader" software commonly used to automate the process. Fidonet, bbscorner.com
    fidonet.org, Randy_Bush.txt
  6. 6.0 6.1 Bonnett, Cara (May 17, 2010). "Duke to shut Usenet server, home to the first electronic newsgroups". Duke University.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>